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. if you are in new york city, schoolteachers and firemen make $100,000 a year and they are easily in households the approach the limit. it depends and where you live. among high-income people, there is a wide range of what people pay in taxes. if you're a lawyer in washington, i find them to be reasonable people who work long hours. you are probably paying 28%. if you are on wall street and you are well-connected if you have a capacity to have your income defined as investment as opposed to salary even though it is indeed salary income. if you are somebody like jamie dimon or warren buffet, you can get away with 14% tax. the real problem with upper individuals are not the people who pay the taxes we intend for the to pay, but all the people who get away without paying any taxes at all. those tax breaks and write offs are derived by the president and by democrats, but they never seem to get fixed. one reason is republicans do not want them fixed. and the other hand, the democrats get a lot of campaign contributions from wall street. that is a real problem on both sides of the aisle
sm. host: joining us from new york city this morning, mr. fund, i just want to begin, if we could, actually, with the front page of "the washington post." in the news that president obama is looking at proposals on guns. obama asked his cabinet members for ideas to curb violence. what do you make of that? guest: well, we've been this way before. in 1994, president clinton signed an assault weapons ban into law. it expired in 2004. so we have 10 years of experience of what that ban did. and frankly, a university of pennsylvania study looked at all of that said that while there was some slight decrease in the use of assault weapons, it did nothing for overall gun violence. assault weapons, semi-automatics are used between 2% and 8% of crimes and it said the gun ban did nothing to reduce the overall level of gun violence in this country. look, i mean, this is a very tragic situation. and it's a very emotional one. it's at least an emotional issue as abortion or the death penalty. and emotions run high here. and we have a very deeply divided country. we have a large chunk of the count
community outside of chicago that passed a city ordinance or you could not own a gun. that, a small community outside of atlanta passed a city ordinance requiring every household to own a gun. they had an exception for those who had a conscientious objection to owning a gun, but what happened? the crime rate skyrocketed. why? because the criminals knew that the citizens could not protect themselves. the criminals went to places where the criminals could carry out their activities and do their stealing and things without having the danger of someone trying to protect their property or their lives. the crime rate went up markedly in that area. the real solutions -- i am working on solutions. both parties are guilty of spending money we do not have. we have to stop that and we have to start looking at areas of the federal government where we can send those dollars back to the states. my job under the constitution as it was intended was to come into washington making sure we have a strong national defense, making sure our foreign affairs are at the best interest of this country, voting
to the republican line from new york city. caller:hi, i am a physician and worked in the time of son of sam and i treated one of his last victims. the destruction that a sudden killing like this is enormous. i think the mental health screening has to be more pori part of this. the fact that we cannot commit people showing extreme mental illness with several rights laws is a deeper issue than gun control. >host: how should vice president joe biden and the white house address this. mental illness is part of the debate and will be part of the solution. >> i think they really need to look at civil rights laws and be able to intervene more aggressively with mental health professionals when people show a consistent pattern of mental illness. i think you can travel through any city in america and see massive amounts of people who are not capable of taking care of themselves. as a society, we are not humanitarian when we leave them to defend themselves. >host: this argument is not new. it is highlighted in the extensive report in "the washington post." the chair of the senate judiciary committee, joe bid
to reclaim land in that city that was pushed aside by saddam hussein when he was dictator. there is a problem with the rise of al qaeda in iraq and bank at the same time, iraq has not pulled over like they did in 2005. i think that is in part because all major parties are not prepared to go to the brink like that and i think there is some hope that over time the u.s. engagement with the iraqi military can be a positive thing. you can see if things -break the right way with iraq, you see a relationship with the army that would be much different than the u.s. relationship with the egyptian military, that you would really find a more mature relationship. host: our guest is a senior national security correspondent. from minnesota on our republican line, go ahead. color code do you think the israeli-palestinian situation is going to -- caller: do you think the israeli-palestinian situation is going to come to a head pretty soon? do you think we should put pressure on israel to get rid of their nuclear weapons? if we really want peace over there, shouldn't we want everyone in that region do not hav
. host: -- that is just a portion of what is in the new york times this morning. next is mary in sun city, california. go ahead. we are listening. caller: i am in the rental business in california. i hear california is very big on welfare and section 8. i see there are so many programs where somebody gets to stay home and the government will pay a three-bedroom rent and they only pay $14 a month. they stay home for 10 years, 15 years, or whatever simply because they have children. being in the military, a lot of my friends, the parents work. but these people are not in the military and they get medical, they get food stamps, they get wic. there's never a change in the programs to motivate people to go to work. host: what would you like to see done? caller: i would like to see that the welfare and section 8 programs and these programs out there, that they tell the people you go to work and we will subsidize -- we will give you a small check to help you support your little family. a lot of these people on these programs are not married. they are single parents. my friends in the military ar
: and that the wall street journal, their front page -- back to the telethons, panama city on the line for republicans. go ahead. caller: yes, good morning. i just wanted to say, we should be able to vote to congress out on no-confidence. we should have been no confidence bill to get them all out. >host: do you think that would work? caller: it would be better than what we have now. look at what it costs us per day. we are in a gridlock. it is causing tax payers millions of dollars. let's vote about and start over. host: what makes you think if they brought in 535 new people that the situation would be better than it is right now? caller: it would not be better than it is right now, but it would be better a in the future. it would get to a better place. i think the fear of a no- confidence vote might stir somebody -- it might get people working a little bit more aggressively. host: as we continue the discussion on the senate negotiating a fiscal of deal, we want to look at other items this morning. this is from "the new york times." mike on the line for independents. your thoughts on that the senate n
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7